Wednesday, February 13, 2008

CERT Search and Rescue Online Training

Our own Steve Willey helped with this training. This tutorial allows CERT-trained individuals to review and refresh their skills in sizeup and search and rescue techniques. Teams can use the tutorial as a group refresher activity. Those who are not yet CERT members can also use the tutorial for background on the CERT basic training.

I haven't gone all the way through it but here are my immediate impressions:

1.) I had some usability issues on how the tutorial was designed.

2.) I found our approach to victim care is slightly different. While the sizeup and hazard identification is excellent, the victim care in this tutorial is more from our "secondary" search perspective ... you are entering to extricate the victim. For our primary search, we focus on immediate life-saving care and finding victims (taking the worst hurt and easiest to get out with us when we return to command / medical of course!) - not so much on clearing paths and untrapping victims.

If you take the tutorial, I would be interested in hearing your impressions on it. Please return and add a comment to this post. Thanks!
http://www.citizencorps.gov/cert/SandR/default.htm

At the end of this tutorial, you will have applied your CERT training to:

  • identify size up requirements for potential search and rescue situations
  • understand the most common techniques for searching a building
  • use safe techniques for debris removal and victim extrication

2 comments:

  1. That sure does take a long time. How long is the entire refresher?

    And since Steve wrote it, how do we make that our official Fairfax County refresher course? Is there a final screen to print and send in? Are we not going to do refreshers anymore.

    It does an excellent job of reinforcing the skills we learned, a little long, but gets you thinking.

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  2. This is not in lieu of a formal refresher ... nothing takes the place of being in the field. You summed it up nicely in your final paragraph -- it's a way of reminding ourselves of the skills we learned in class and in our training drills and scenarios.

    Thanks!

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